The Library of Congress is Adding Webcomics

13 June 2017

“Dinosaur Comics!” “Hyperbole and a Half” and “xkcd” are among the initial class of now-nationally-archived webcomics I grew up reading.

The Washington Post:

The library will announce Tuesday that the Webcomics Web Archive is officially launching at loc.gov as part of its growth in “born-digital” collections.

The first phase of the webcomics online collection will include nearly 40 titles, including such long-running works as Josh Lesnick’s “Girly” and Zach Weiner’s “Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal.”

I’m so happy for all of these folks.

You Are Not Google

09 June 2017

A longish read which is better summed up at the very top:

[…] if you’re using a technology that originated at a large company, but your use case is very different, it’s unlikely that you arrived there deliberately; no, it’s more likely you got there through a ritualistic belief that imitating the giants would bring the same riches.

I see this a lot, and even sometimes have to fight it myself. The new tool usually isn’t the best one. In fact, it almost never is. One of the reasons we have the old tools is that they worked and still work really well.

Motherboard: The Hidden Stories Lingering in RadioShack’s Bankruptcy Auction

08 June 2017

Apparently there are now about 70 Radio Shacks left across America. I’ve scavenged a few closings here in San Francisco. I will cherish those still-overpriced-at-70%-off toggle switches forever:

But buried in the recent news about store closings—which have largely decimated a chain of thousands of locations—is the fact that the company is auctioning off much of its storied history in a Ubid estate auction that’s going on for the next month or so.

And the stories behind some of those objects are better than you think.

The uBid auction has some pretty surreal stuff in it. Did you know Radio Shack produced an LP of trucker jams (such as Convoy), called Put The Hammer Down? And that it was certified gold?

Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech

06 June 2017

Kottke:

Bob Dylan finally delivered his Nobel Prize lecture in the form of a video (you can also listen to it on Soundcloud). Over the course of just 27 minutes, he talks about his influences, both musical and literary, and muses on the differences and similarities between music and literature. Listening to the speech, instead of just reading the transcript, is well-worth your time, if only to experience Dylan’s lyrical delivery while exalting Buddy Holly or explaining Moby Dick.

I grew up listening to a LOT of Bob Dylan. A LOT.

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My name is Phil Nelson and I make beautiful objects for a troubled world. I'm a designer / developer / writer / director / editor / narrator at Occipital.

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