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Pure CSS Progress Bar

This is very pretty, but requires a WebKit-based browser (Chrome, Safari).

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Unitless line-heights

A handy CSS tip and technique that I was previously unaware of.

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Prefix or Posthack

Eric Meyer, in praise of browser prefixes such as -webkit:

If the history of web standards has shown us anything, it’s that hacks will be necessary. By front-loading the hacks using vendor prefixes and enshrining them in the standards process, we can actually fix some of the potential problems with the process and possibly accelerate CSS development.

I’d add that vendor prefixes work very well with a steady diet of progressive enhancement. You, as a developer, are not bound by law to make every element on every page look exactly the same in every browser. The less tied-down each of us are, the faster all of us can move.

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Nivo Slider

It bills itself as “The Most Awesome jQuery Image Slider,” and once you see it you will, if not agree entirely, see where they’re coming from.

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Introducing FRMT.me

FRMT.me is an online CSS formatter using the Extra Future house style rules, which I’ve yet to codify here but will soon. It is one of my 6-hour projects, and as such is considered a sibling to Megaman II’s Intro in HTML, CSS, and jQuery.

House style on the name is to print the domain all caps and the TLD in lowercase, like so: FRMT.me.

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Pie Guy, a free web game for your iPhone by Neven Mrgan

Pure HTML, CSS and Javascript, no App Store required. Play it.

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Using Helvetica Neue Light In Firefox + Safari

Great tip from Guillermo Esteves. Worked a charm on this very site.

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Bulletproof @font-face syntax

Paul Irish’s guide to the best @font-face syntax for all compatible browsers.

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Text Rotation with CSS

Can I get a witness? Not only does it work, it works NOW.

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Web Fonts Now, for real

Zeldman on a proposed webfont permissions table. This seems sort of like attaching a file to a movie that says DO NOT STEAL and expecting it to work.

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LESS – Leaner CSS

Consolidates and optimizes CSS in a way which I’ve not seen before. Which is cool, but it would be nice if it could convert it BACK so humans could read/edit it easily. Check the examples, you will be glad you did. Hey, it does do that.

via simplebits.

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Introducing Typekit

A platform for css3’s @font-face. The real test of this will be how many hoops you have to jump through to embed a font, and how it handles failure:

We’ve built a technology platform that lets us to host both free and commercial fonts in a way that is incredibly fast, smoothes out differences in how browsers handle type, and offers the level of protection that type designers need without resorting to annoying and ineffective DRM.

The upside is that having a central place to access these fonts will be great for caching.

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Mozilla Labs Jetpack

Extending Firefox with open web technologies like jQuery, HTML and CSS. I am thinking of it as the next generation of Greasemonkey.

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Tal Leming on Embedded Web Fonts

A rare take on embedded web fonts from someone who actually makes fonts and sells them for a living. He suggests a DRM system using a “root table” that says what fonts can be used on what domains, but then says this:

There is nothing that can be done about this. All we can do is present a person with a fork in the road. The person can license the font to give the designer the respect he/she deserves for creating something that the person likes and wants to use. Or, they can ignore the Golden Rule and hack the font.

If that’s the case, and he knows it’s the case, then why not forget the DRM entirely? Why not trust people to do the right thing from the start, and call them out on it when they don’t?