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HTML WG Working Drafts Have Been Published

The list includes HTML5, HTML+RDFa, HTML Microdata, HTML Canvas 2D Context, HTML5 Differences from HTML4 and HTML: The Markup Language.

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W3C Director Tim Berners-Lee Rejects Adobe’s HTML5 Procedural Arguements

In other words, “Sorry Adobe, but we’re going to keep making new things you don’t like.

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MPEGLA Announces H.264 To Remain Royalty-Free (For Free Content) Until 2016

This is a good thing, for now, but licensing-wise H.264 is actually probably worse than Flash. It works great with a hardware decoder, but why should I trust the MPEGLA to not pull the rug out from under the internet in 6 years? Of note: The 2016 deadline only applies to “Internet Video that is Free to End Users.” Who gets to define “free?”

The press release should’ve been subtitled “Your Move, Adobe.”

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A Form of Madness

The latest addition to Mark Pilgrim’s quickly-becoming-essential “Dive Into HTML5” series is about forms, and it is (as one might expect) the most cogent description of HTML5’s new form attributes and types that I’ve seen so far.

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“Google waving goodbye to Gears, hello to HTML5”

In other words, full-steam ahead for Chrome and HTML5,, and I’m glad.

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Dive Into HTML5: Video

Mark Pilgrim dives in to HTML5 video, and swims around. This is essential reading for web developers.

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Misunderstanding markup

Jeremy Keith explains some of the problems of perception in the recent XHTML2/HTML5 showdown. If you’ve been confused thus-far, let this be your panacea.

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W3C Abandoning XHTML 2, Focusing on HTML5

Today the Director announces that when the XHTML 2 Working Group charter expires as scheduled at the end of 2009, the charter will not be renewed.

This is giant news for anyone who makes websites. See also: W3C’s FAQ for the situation.

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Ian Hickson on Codecs for

Mozilla won’t support H.264, Apple won’t support Ogg, Google will support both, and Microsoft won’t say. Doubt this will change anytime soon, which really makes me sad.

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HTML 5: Could it kill Flash and Silverlight?

If we are lucky.

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Closing Tabs 5/27/09

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Dave Shea on Why He’s Backing HTML5

The points he makes are good ones, and I agree with most of them. The comments are pretty lively on this one, but seem civilized.

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Sam Ruby on Rev Canonical

The short list of grievances: Twitter doesn’t support it, and may never. HTML5 omits rev entirely. Atom uses the self attribute for the very purposes that rev="canonical" might be used for.