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W3C green-lights adding DRM to the Web’s standards

This is pretty close to the worst possible thing they could’ve done:

Here’s the bad news: the World Wide Web Consortium is going ahead with its plan to add DRM to HTML5, setting the stage for browsers that are designed to disobey their owners and to keep secrets from them so they can’t be forced to do as they’re told. Here’s the (much) worse news: the decision to go forward with the project of standardizing DRM for the Web came from Tim Berners-Lee himself, who seems to have bought into the lie that Hollywood will abandon the Web and move somewhere else (AOL?) if they don’t get to redesign the open Internet to suit their latest profit-maximization scheme.

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WebPlatform Docs

A new initiative from the W3C:

Web Platform Docs is a new community-driven site that aims to become a comprehensive and authoritative source for web developer documentation.

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HTML is the new HTML5

Ian Hickson:

The WHATWG HTML spec can now be considered a “living standard”. It’s more mature than any version of the HTML specification to date, so it made no sense for us to keep referring to it as merely a draft. We will no longer be following the “snapshot” model of spec development, with the occasional “call for comments”, “call for implementations”, and so forth.

Behold, HTML’s living specification. The w3c is still looking to publish a “snapshot” of HTML5.

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W3C Director Tim Berners-Lee Rejects Adobe’s HTML5 Procedural Arguements

In other words, “Sorry Adobe, but we’re going to keep making new things you don’t like.

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Misunderstanding markup

Jeremy Keith explains some of the problems of perception in the recent XHTML2/HTML5 showdown. If you’ve been confused thus-far, let this be your panacea.

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W3C Abandoning XHTML 2, Focusing on HTML5

Today the Director announces that when the XHTML 2 Working Group charter expires as scheduled at the end of 2009, the charter will not be renewed.

This is giant news for anyone who makes websites. See also: W3C’s FAQ for the situation.