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CSS Sans

A font constructed entirely by CSS. It is, essentially, a programmatic realtime typeface. I love how it degrades for older versions of IE:

It’s not what I’d consider practical for production use. Still, CSS Sans is a hell of a demonstration of how far CSS has come since Microsoft shipped Internet Explorer 3 in 1996, which was first browser to implement some of the CSS1 spec (CSS v1 was not yet a W3C recommendation).

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Trail Type

A user-generated collection of typography from national parks and other ‘wild’ spaces. Beautiful stuff.

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Big, Beautiful Dropcaps with CSS initial-letter

Nice post from Dudley Storey on the new CSS proposal for initial-letter. CSS typography has come a long way in the previous 5 years but we’re still in the woods with a lot of the things that print media take for granted.

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Font-To-Width

Font‑To‑Width (FTW!) is a script by Nick Sherman and Chris Lewis that takes advantage of large type families to fit pieces of text snugly within their containers.

Can definitely see using this for some datavis stuff. There is some FOUT (Flash of unstyled text) to deal with though.

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tinytype – a table showing all of the available default system fonts across different mobile platforms

No surprise that Android has the fewest, with a grand total of FOUR.

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Typeset In The Future

A blog dedicated to identifying fonts in science fiction.

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Beautiful web type

A collection / demo of the “best” typefaces from Google’s web font directory. Well-curated and paired nicely. This is a great resource.

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The thorny problem of “ye”

John August on the (to me, anyway) revelation that the quaint olden-times word “Ye”, as in “Ye Olde Shoppe,” was actually pronounced “the” and was the result of typesetting problems relating to the missing “Thorn” glyph in many printing fonts.

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Contrast Rebellion

Let’s put an end to this low-contrast, light gray nonsense and use typography for its purpose: Making text readable.

That’s a rallying cry I can echo without hesitation.

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Google Web Fonts 2.0

Newest in an avalanche of Google service redesigns. Is 2011 the year Google gets serious about design? Sure seems like it.

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Lettering.js

A very intriguing typography plugin for jQuery. The example gallery is pretty damned impressive.

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Lost Type Co-op

Very nice typefaces with a pay-what-you-like profit model. The website is fun, too.

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WhatFont

A nifty little JS bookmarklet that tells you what font is being used on the text you’re hovering over. No more digging through CSS files for this cowboy.

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Open Source Ampersands

Single-use site by Mark Pilgrim inspired by Dan Cederholm’s blog post Use the Best Ampersand Available.

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Unitless line-heights

A handy CSS tip and technique that I was previously unaware of.

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Ask H&FJ: Four Ways to Mix Fonts

Click it, read it, learn it, love it. These are all essential tips.

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Using Helvetica Neue Light In Firefox + Safari

Great tip from Guillermo Esteves. Worked a charm on this very site.

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Miso

A great-looking, compact, typeface for industry. Comes in 3 flavors and is free for private or commercial use.

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Introducing Typekit

A platform for css3’s @font-face. The real test of this will be how many hoops you have to jump through to embed a font, and how it handles failure:

We’ve built a technology platform that lets us to host both free and commercial fonts in a way that is incredibly fast, smoothes out differences in how browsers handle type, and offers the level of protection that type designers need without resorting to annoying and ineffective DRM.

The upside is that having a central place to access these fonts will be great for caching.